Tag Archive: book review


Zenzoris Returns (The Sophie Radcliffe Series Book 1) by [Burnley, Jenny]

Buy links: Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk

 

Sophie Radcliffe is a gutsy and brilliant (and somewhat foul-mouthed) computer scientist from Texas. She’s also a ten-year veteran of the Intergalactic Law Enforcement Agency. She and her two human partners captured a Drogg criminal named Zenzoris and locked him up forever.

Zenzoris, a particularly ruthless and nasty bad guy, made a promise to exact revenge against Sophie and her planet, and he’s also determined to destroy the Intergalactic Council and seize control of the galaxy.

When Sophie hears he has escaped from his prison pod to instigate his nefarious mission, her job is to recapture him and throw him back in the slammer.

The story is well written with a good plot and surprisingly well developed characters for being so short, and the author also manages to throw in a rather startling twist. The story has aliens, secret portals, computer coding, wormholes, spaceships, stuff blowing up, plenty of action, and some moments that really had me chuckling.

I enjoyed this quick read and I think that anyone who likes science fiction – and space opera in particular – will get a kick out of it.

I give it five stars.

Click to buy @ Amazon – available in ebook and paperback

 

In some respects, this book kind of reminds me of Herman Hesse’s “Siddartha” in that the protagonist is on a path to self-discovery. It is a book that is an experience. It has time-traveling, religion, and science, with a good dollop of mysticism.
From the moment the protagonist awakens to find a mysterious being in his room, you’re off to other dimensions and other worlds as he is taken on a mission that twists through different times and places. He is brought up against a powerful antagonist and placed in circumstances that would blow anyone’s mind yet he somehow manages to maintain his sanity in his attempts to rise to the challenges.
I must admit that I found it somewhat hard to understand in places, and felt there were a few things that could’ve been made clearer. However, I still found it to be quite an intriguing read and I believe it to be a great book for anyone who loves enigmatic plot twists.

4/5 stars

Second Coming: It’s all just a game by Andrew Smith

 

This is a very well written mystery/ thriller/supernatural/horror story which also dips into metaphysics.  I know that’s a mouthful, but that’s how I see it.  Not to mention the very interesting historical component involving the Crusades.  This story has a lot of twists, and I’m going to be as general as possible as I don’t want to introduce any spoilers, but it’s definitely not for children or the faint of heart.   There is no fluff involved here.   This is deep and dark with lots of violent action, and a lot of the horror is not of the supernatural variety.

The book starts a little slow, in Jerusalem, with the very pregnant wife of the protagonist, Charles, stopping on a lark to see a fortune teller, or oracle, and immediately getting into a situation that went terribly wrong.  The plot builds up from there, and  I must admit that at first I thought it wasn’t going to be my kind of story or to my tastes at all because of the violence, or the political/religious aspects, and I’m not much into either of those.  If you feel that way, I would advise you to keep reading.  I did, and am extremely glad I did.

The author is so descriptive with his characters that in short order, the reader gets to know them well and they become real people with personalities that are likeable (or not, such as the priest Estevez).  One can get pissed at them for doing something thoughtless, such as Charles’ seeming obliviousness in certain areas of his life which, among other things, strains his relationship with his son, Marcus.

There are plots and subplots, and things are not all black or white; the reader gets a sense of people doing the things they do because they believe it’s their duty or is the right thing to do (even if they’re wrong).  These are not cardboard characters; even the bad guys have layers (though some are what I, or anybody else, would consider to be just plain bad).    We learn a great deal about the revenant, Izz al-Din, and to my shock, there came a point where I found myself actually sympathizing with him, and believe me, I can’t remember a time when I’ve done that before!  And, he’s a truly bad, bad guy.  Trust me: this bad guy’s story has a real twist, in more ways than one.   The author sure knows how to surprise you and how to use words to paint images so you actually see a particular scene, some of which get pretty graphic.

This is a full-length, standalone novel but did leave what can only be construed as some “loose ends”, so I’m sincerely hoping there’s a sequel in the works.  In the meantime, this book is a highly intriguing, thrilling and enjoyable read.

I must say that this is a good book.  Because I read book two first (at the time I didn’t realize there was a book one), I thought this one would be anticlimactic.  However, I was wrong.  It does answer one major question I had while reading book two, but this is an entertaining story that stands quite well on its own.

The protagonist, a most unlikable man – a telepathic serial killer with paranormal powers – is in prison awaiting trial for his crimes.  He’s bent on causing disruption, both in prison and in court, and “going out with a bang” but is thwarted in his efforts by the Friar of a secretive order of the Catholic Church when he is pressed into service to stop a living legend from the Bible who’s working to bring about the Apocalypse.

It’s a case of fighting fire with fire (or evil with evil) that begins a little slow but twists its way to an unusual, action packed, conclusion.

As I discovered with book two, it is well written with few errors in a style that is easy to read and understand, and I’m looking forward to book three.

I think anyone who’s a fan of paranormal/supernatural fiction that has a Biblical bent, will enjoy this story.

A Review of “The Order of the Wolf” by Freddie Silva

Okay.  I have to tell the truth.  When I first saw this book, for some reason I had the notion it was about werewolves. You know, with the usual storyline of alpha males, fawning females trying to get next to the alpha, soul mates, pack fights, that sort of thing.  Even after reading the blurb I still thought a werewolf might be in there somewhere.  Don’t get me wrong, I love a good werewolf story but really wasn’t in the mood for one.  Then I read the sample before buying, and boy, was I delightfully wrong!  And, after reading the book, I’m happy to say: I was wonderfully wrong!

Instead, what I found was an engaging tale set in an alternate world and time.  A world of warring kingdoms and mercenary warriors who, though fighting for different rulers of the land, try to hold to a code of honor.  The story begins directly after the destruction in battle of a particular company in the Order of the Wolf, called The Old Guard, wherein our protagonist has been horribly wounded, and is the only surviving member of his company.  He wants to die and join his comrades but is instead, healed and pressed into training a company of newbies by the Order commander.

The story takes off from there through a string of twists and turns, some of them political, all of them intriguing.  It has lots of action but is not just a litany of one battle after another.  There’s even a touch of humor, and, it has a hint of romance but not enough to make you wonder what it’s doing in a story of war and bloodshed as it fits the circumstances.

The writing is clear and concise and the story moves right along.  My only complaint is that it ended before I was ready for it to!  I want to know more!  I want to know what happens next!  Now, I have to sit and wait – impatiently – for the sequel.

I’d recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a good read that has action, adventure, and intrigue, set in another time and place.

Most definitely: Five stars!

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